How Safe Is the Cooking Gas Cylinder in Your Home?| May Ubeku’s Story Is a Wake Up Call

Friday, July 28th was like any other day for Blogger and Public Affairs Analyst, May Ubeku, but things took a different turn and she ended up admitted in the hospital for serious gas burns. “What happened?”, you might wonder.

May went to her kitchen to make herself a cup of tea, she struck a match to light her cooker and next thing she she heard was an explosion — she was covered in flames. Her cooking gas leaked because the cylinder valve was not well locked. May shared her story so we can learn from it.

SEE ALSO:Omoni Oboli Advises Mothers to Teach their Sons How to Cook As She Shows off Son’s Cooking Skills

Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) also called cooking gas, is much cleaner than kerosene, producing low emissions when burned. This makes it better for the environment. It is heavier than air and is often compressed into holding tanks, which can be purchased and filled at many gas stations. However, cooking gas can also be toxic when inhaled and is highly combustible — a leak could result in an explosion if the gas encounters a flame or spark.

There are four major cooking fuels in Nigeria and they are:- Cooking Gas also called LPG, Kerosene, Coal and Wood. Most who can afford it, prefer the Cooking Gas as it is safer, cleaner and less cumbersome to use.  But do you know the cooking gas cylinders can pose a danger if not managed properly in the home?

SEE ALSO:So Sad! Dad Abandons his 3 Year Old Burn Victim Daughter in Calabar Hospital

 

Life is fragileToday you're here smiling and the next second, you're no more. Someone contacted me yesterday to post…

Posted by May Ubeku on Friday, July 28, 2017

“What are ways to prevent this accident from happening in my home?” I hear you ask.

Follow me:

  1. Keep the windows open to ventilate your kitchen
  2. Do not place flammable or plastic items near the flame
  3. Never leave your cooking unattended. The cooking vessel could overflow and extinguish the burners, causing gas to leak.
  4. Close the regulator knob to OFF position when cylinder is not in use
  5. When keeping the cylinder outside, place it in a cabinet which has wire mesh provided at the bottom to allow LP gas to escape into the air in case of a leak.
  6. Not more than two cylinders should be stored in a room. To keep two cylinders, the kitchen should have minimum floor area of 10 sq. meters.
  7. Do not keep cylinder exposed to sun, rain, dust and heat.
  8. Do not keep any vessel / utensil / cloth etc. on the top of cylinder.
  9. The appliance must be at least one metre away from electric wiring, switch or plug points. Keep the kitchen clean as far as practicable to avoid rats, cockroaches etc.
  10. Always have a working fire extinguisher at home and know how to use it.

Photo credit: Emirates247

SEE ALSO:4 Reasons To Enlist Your Little Child’s Help In The Kitchen Irrespective of their Sexes

When you suspect a leak:

When you observe the smell of gas, there might be a leak in the LPG equipment. This is dangerous as it can lead to fire or explosion.

It is important not to use a match a lighter to detect the leak, because this may induce a fire. Instead, use a soap water solution instead.

When using this solution, a leak can easily be detected by the appearance of a bubbly substance, whereas a good connection will see the soap leak away in fluid form.

It is important not to operate any electrical appliances either by switching the button on or off.

Windows and doors should be opened for the dispersion of the leak. If the leak persists, remove the cylinder to a safe and open/ventilated place.

SEE ALSO:Omoni Oboli’s Writes Letter to Her Lucky Future Daughter In-law

If the smell persists, call your Gas distributor during office hours. For emergencies after office hours or on holidays please call up your nearest Emergency service cell.

You can find more safety tips in these pictures:

Make sure you double-check your gas cylinders today using this as a guide. Let’s keep our homes safe.

 

 

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